On Making America Great Again, Trolls, Invective and Progress

A few thoughts:

  1. Regardless of how one feels about President Trump, Democrats or Republicans, flailing about invectives isn’t going to get us anywhere. I know of no one who’s change their stance on any issue because some troll called them “idiot” or “snowflake” or “nazi”.
  2. It’s quite interesting to me the role that the internet has played in degenerating the stuff talked about in point 1.
  3. On “Making America Great AGAIN”: that’s one that I’ve thought quite a bit about recently. Simply, the MAGA folks seem to look backwards to when “America WAS Great”. Progressives look forward to Making America Great FINALLY. Seeing potential, the strengths of diverse communities, economies and cultures. But the distinction between the two mind-sets hit me hard recently.
  4. Somehow, we need to find a way to embrace dignity in our public discourse. However, I’m totally at a loss about implementing that.

There’s more to talk about considering holding to a long-view. However, that will need to wait.

Fan Engagement: Zoe Keating

I’ve been a fan of Zoe Keating for years. Besides enjoying her music greatly, I’ve also been very interested in the way she interacts with her fans. She’s used today’s social media landscape exceptionally well to build her brand, and a career as a musician within a very unique niche.

Her main tools for engagement are:

What’s a bit more surprising to me are the tools she doesn’t use. Her YouTube channel is pretty spare, and not recently updated. Considering how much I’ve heard about video being “the” thing, looks like she’s experimented with it and has moved along. Now, if you search for her music there, you’ll find tons of videos, but that’s mostly uploads from fans, interviews and such. Also, her music has been uploaded to Vimeo, but, again, not by her. So, she’s present in the world of video, but not deeply so.

I’m also surprised she doesn’t have any campaigns on Patreon nor on Kickstarter. Now, her music is available on iTunes, Spotify, and many other online services. So she might not feel the need to have these income streams. Other musicians and artists in similar styles and viewpoints use them quite heavily, like Amanda Palmer.

Considering all that, it’s important to look at which of these avenues is the most profitable to her. As the chart below shows (created by the folks at Business Insider), most of her income comes from iTunes, Bandcamp and Amazon.

Graph of Zoe Keating's income sources
A look at Zoe Keating’s income sources

* Some thoughts on Fanbridge: I imagine it’s a great tool, and it is competitively priced. But it’s important to point out that Mailchimp is quite a bit cheaper, at least at the start. I also wonder if it interacts with any specialized CRM (Customer Relationship Management) tools. That would certainly bump up the value of Fanbridge. Mailchimp plays well with several CRM tools. Also, some of the serious competitors, like Constant Contact or Salesforce have those tools fully baked in. With that, I’m unaware of Zoe using any CRM tools. Doesn’t mean she doesn’t, just don’t see anything.

Lastly, Ms. Keating speaks some to these point in the video below. Worth your while.

If you’ve liked what you read, please take a moment to let me know in the comments. And give it a share!

This was originally posted here. 

Zoe Keating: Effectively Engaging Fans

I’ve been a fan of Zoe Keating for years. Besides enjoying her music greatly, I’ve also been very interested in the way she interacts with her fans. She’s used today’s social media landscape exceptionally well to build her brand, and a career as a musician within a very unique niche.

Her main tools for engagement are:

What’s a bit more surprising to me are the tools she doesn’t use. Her YouTube channel is pretty spare, and not recently updated. Considering how much I’ve heard about video being “the” thing, looks like she’s experimented with it and has moved along. Now, if you search for her music there, you’ll find tons of videos, but that’s mostly uploads from fans, interviews and such. Also, her music has been uploaded to Vimeo, but, again, not by her. So, she’s present in the world of video, but not deeply so.

I’m also surprised she doesn’t have any campaigns on Patreon nor on Kickstarter. Now, her music is available on iTunes, Spotify, and many other online services. So she might not feel the need to have these income streams. Other musicians and artists in similar styles and viewpoints use them quite heavily, like Amanda Palmer.

Considering all that, it’s important to look at which of these avenues is the most profitable to her. As the chart below shows (created by the folks at Business Insider), most of her income comes from iTunes, Bandcamp and Amazon.

Graph of Zoe Keating's income sources
A look at Zoe Keating’s income sources

* Some thoughts on Fanbridge: I imagine it’s a great tool, and it is competitively priced. But it’s important to point out that Mailchimp is quite a bit cheaper, at least at the start. I also wonder if it interacts with any specialized CRM (Customer Relationship Management) tools. That would certainly bump up the value of Fanbridge. Mailchimp plays well with several CRM tools. Also, some of the serious competitors, like Constant Contact or Salesforce have those tools fully baked in. With that, I’m unaware of Zoe using any CRM tools. Doesn’t mean she doesn’t, just don’t see anything.

Lastly, Ms. Keating speaks some to these points in the video below. Worth your while.

If you’ve liked what you read, please take a moment to let me know in the comments. And give it a share!

Comotion Labs, Friends And VR’s Potential 

A friend of mine is working out Comotion Labs here in Seattle. Sunday afternoon, I got a tour of the space and an update on his projects. 

This for me thinking about VR and the cool stuff that’s coming down the pike. 

So elements are easy to predict. Things like entertainment, gaming and porn will in the first wave of adopters. Having the past several years in real estate, I see all kinds of potential disruption in that sector. Virtual tours have massive possibilities with VR. 

One thing I’m not hearing about, but that hit me this weekend: engineering. The ability to conceptualize a space will be immense. I see an amazing change simply being able to rotate an object in space. It will also make equipment training much better. Brings able to see all the pieces of a project will radically help operators.

I see medical possibilities, and so many other possibilities. Within 10 years, our lives will be radically different. It’ll be fun getting there. 

“How We Broke Democracy (But Not in the Way You Think)”

“How We Broke Democracy (But Not in the Way You Think)” @TobiasRose https://medium.com/@tobiasrose/empathy-to-democracy-b7f04ab57eee

The piece above helped cement some ideas they’ve been floating in my head for some time.

  • We live within echo chambers, information and idea-wise. Algorithmic newsfeeds drive this with vigor. It’s hard to break free
  • Humanity seems drawn towards comfort. Comfortable ideas, thoughts, foods…and resist variations with vigor.
  • With that, our culture keeps moving towards ease of offense. Exposure to conflicting ideas elicits very strong fears, and, thus rage. Most don’t like this sensation and respond by retracting into their data bubbles.
  • Sadly, this behavior is counter to what needs to happen for community to grow.
  • All this helps explain the intense shock felt upon Trump’s election.

Good insights in the article. It’s well worth the read.

My Social Media Management Philosophy

I managed social media for several companies. My desire had always been organic growth. Most of my efforts are via thoughtful content and local engagement. My strategies do include the use of such tools as Google and Facebook ads, thatsbtgenlimit of paid reach. I never advise the buying of followers. 

I’ve known several folks that have done so. Now, ostensibly it looks great. Having thousands of followers looks like it grants you significant authority, makes you look like an influencer. More sophisticated eyes will see through it. When most of your followers are bots, for instance, the validity of your authority becomes suspect. 

With that, paid followers don’t provide meaningful engagement. We need to remember the why. Why did you start social media? Probably to gain customers. The likelihood any of those paid followers is going to turn into a client is pretty near zero. 

Don’t get wrapped up in the numbers. It’s better to have a few subscribers or followers who are fully engaged with you, than tens of thousands who don’t. Influencing is far more about engagement than about follower counts. 

Vlog update: August 11, 2016 – Evolution of “The Media”

 

Side note: I know I need to have the camera sideways, but am still getting the hang of that layout. It is rather awkward.

Some thoughts on “Serious academics take the media seriously”

I found this post over at Small Pond Science fascinating. As a fan of science, if not a scientist, and deeply interested in social media’s presence in our society, Terry’s McGlynn’s post is very relevant. Terry calls out an anonymous article over at The Guardian basically dismissing efforts by scientists to engage with their work in the world of Facebook & Twitter.

I, for one, think there’s great value in the public debate. Not everything on social media is fluff. And, if it’s to be taken seriously, we need to encourage more, not less engagement by scholars online.

A vlog post: Pokemon Go

Pokemon Go is quite the thing right now. There’s stuff to learn with all this.

Bloody Small Screens

If you know anything about me, I LOVE the mobile revolution. However, I’m noticing that posting on the small screens increases the rate of small errors. Little autocorrect word substitutions, mainly. Ones small enough, and having enough of the right letters in a similar sequence as the desired word that they go live wrong.

Had such this morning. Posted an update to a Facebook page I manage with “create” in place of “great”. I read the post several times before hitting publish. Ugh!

I take my writing seriously, so even small grammatical errors bother me. So, with that, I have been trying to post more from a computer, something with a monitor. I notice that my erorr rate is much smaller that way. Plus, I feel more focused.

And I need to recognize I’m human and mistakes will happen. But I never intend to like it, and will be satisfied with any mistakes. Ever.